Gluten Free Hearty Country Flax Bread: from America’s Test Kitchen


“If you don’t like the way things look, change the way you look at them!”

This very clever saying, applicable to much in life, could not be more appropriate for my challenges in living a gluten free lifestyle. In the hit and miss, mostly miss… of purchasing gluten free products, I’ve discovered quite naturally that just like in most things you want to eat, making your own is usually best.

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And how is it, you’re wondering, that I’ve changed how I look at this…? It did come with time, as with learning anything new, when I realized that instead of focusing on what I was missing, I moved the focus to what I could have. And then to what I could do about it. The added bonus of that philosophy was discovering a very important thing: in making substitutions for regular white flour, you have the opportunity to add nutritional value, as well as variations of taste. With the abundance of gluten free flours & substitutes available, the options range from earthy chick pea flour, brown rice flour and quinoa flour – to ‘flours’ made from nuts such as almonds or ground seeds, including flax. They all bring their own flavour, texture and nutrition to the recipe – whatever the recipe might be.

If you’ve tried any store bought gluten free products, the first thing you’ll notice is the difference in texture.. and it IS noticeable. Sadly many GF baked goods have the texture of sand, with the resulting crumble when you bite into them. So, so disappointing. But… it leads you to either find a decent, not too over-priced GF bakery, or in my case, the quest to find decent enough recipes to make your own. So be it.

Of the GF bread recipes I’ve tried so far many of them were so horrible they were not worthy to post. This recipe is hands-down the best so far, with a good crumb/texture & flavour, but like most GF bread products require toasting to bring out their best.

Here’s the link for the gluten free flour blend from America’s Test Kitchen.

[yumprint-recipe id=’27’] 

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